Wednesday, May 7, 2014

The Cut Flower Patch-Win The Book

To win this book, read the review and then leave a comment at the bottom of the article. Instructions for commenting are at the foot of the  page. You do not have to be a subscriber, follower or have a google account, just use the name option. The contest closes May 21st. The winner will be announced on the blog and at the meeting.

The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley.


The book is divided into the following chapters:

Planning a cutting patch-has planting plans, from easy to advanced, and shopping lists
Recommended flowers -all the flowers included in the book will last at least five days, some up to two weeks, before beginning to flag. This section also covers abundance and length of blooming. There is extensive information about each and a colour photograph:

-Annuals & biennials

The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley
cornflower
Bulbs, corms & tubers


The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley

Foliage & fillers
Dianthus barbutus 'Green Trick'



Making your cutting patch

    A page from Chapter 2 of The Cut Flower Patch



    • Caring for your patch
    • Cutting time
    • Showing off

    The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley



    The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley






    The invaluable tips page takes any stress out of flower arranging-Louise is a proponent of quick and simple.


    Rich pickings-plants to pick for each season
    The Cut Flower Patch by Louise Curley
    opium poppy seed heads
    A year on the patch-Louise takes us through a year in her own cutting garden
      Louise is a master of her craft. The book is crammed with detailed practical steps however her writing dances lightly across the page making it easy to absorb. The images, a delight for the eye, are used well and complement the text.

      As with all books written on one side of the pond or the other, Louise is in England, the resource page is specific to that country. Don't let this put you off, however, as the book has a depth of knowledge which will be appreciated and useful to gardeners everywhere. All the plants mentioned grow well in most parts of the northern hemisphere.

      Louise is the writer behind wellywoman a respected blog out of the U.K. The beautiful and abundant photographs in the book, some of which are featured in this post, are by Jason Ingram.

      For anyone who understands the destruction caused by the commercial cut flower industry, but still wants flowers in the house, this book is the answer.

      The Cut Flower Patch
      Author: Louise Curley
      Hardcover: 224 pages
      Publisher: Frances Lincoln (March 6 2014)
      Language: English
      ISBN-10: 0711234752
      ISBN-13: 978-0711234758
      $21 average price

      For those of you unsure about leaving a comment: Click on the blue "comments"
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      Tell us about your favourite cutting flower and why/how you grow it. If you have photos send them to the blog email or to our facebook page (not required to win but it would be nice to see them).
      powellrivergardenclub@gmail.com
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      27 comments:

      1. Perhaps our local book store could be encouraged to stock Ms Curley's book?

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      2. I'd love to know more about which flowers would be good in our area for cutting. The photo of the cutting garden looks interesting. Does anyone have a specific flower bed that is only cutting flowers or are they mixed in with the rest of the garden?

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        Replies
        1. I hope we get lots of pictures of locally grown flowers along with advice for growing. Thanks for commenting.

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      3. My favorite cut flowers are gladioli, there are so many varieties, and they are so showy!

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      4. Sweet peas are my favourite. They were abundant in the cottage gardens of my childhood and they remind me of old friends.

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      5. I would also be interested to know the best ways to incorporate cut flowers into the overall flower garden.
        Margaret C

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        Replies
        1. We probably have some of the author's recommendations in our gardens already.

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      6. Looks like an interesting book! I love to bring a little bit of the garden inside. However, my 2 1/2 year old grandson reacted with horror at the sight of a cheery vase of forsythias on my table. "Quick Grannie, we have to somehow get these back outside with the other flowers!"

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        Replies
        1. I'm in your grandson's camp. I feel a liitle guilty about cutting flowers and then having them die indoors.. The book makes it easier by suggesting flowers which will last a long time.

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      7. As I am planning/planting my entire acreage in a permaculture fashion and so many plants grown here I am learn ing about I would love to learn about cutting-type plants I can add in.

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        Replies
        1. There is a lot of planning at the start isn't there? So many options and so many decisions, not to mention the labour and cost over the first few years.

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      8. Having flowers for the house is one of the reasons I started gardening.

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        Replies
        1. What a lovely way to start. Do you have any photos of arrangements?

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      9. Jacquie DonaldsonApril 23, 2014 at 4:44 PM

        I've been making small arrangements from hellebores, daffodils and other spring bloomers but can't wait for the summer flowers.

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        Replies
        1. Fresh flowers in the house, however small, lift the spirits after a dreary winter. Do you have a picture you could email?

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      10. My first neighbor in Westview was Jo Greenwood and she always had bouquets of the most interesting things. Everytime I bring in some cuttings for a vase, I think of her and her "herbaceous borders". I love sweet peas and dahlias- and would love to grow better zinneas.

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      11. Interesting info. I never thought to think about planting flowers thinking specifically for cutting them later. Sounds like a very interesting read. I'd love to read this book. Cheers, Wendy Harvey

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      12. My favorite cut flower is a rose called Graham Thomas. I put them is vases or float them in bowls. They are very fragrant, with an apple scent, and my 2 rose bushes produce hundreds of flowers in the summer. Their pale lemon yellow color is stunning!

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        Replies
        1. Sheila, I have Graham Thomas on my planting list. I expect you know it was named after the rosarian Graham Thomas who did more than anyone to rescue and preserve the heritage roses of Europe. I have visited his rose garden at Mottisfont Abbey and plan to go again this year. Sue

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      13. Melody 604-344-1777May 13, 2014 at 10:17 AM

        I too would love to learn about growing cut flowers... for our yard and for our patio/sundeck. But most importantly for our two children. I grew an appreciation for flowers as a child, and I want the same for ours. Thank you for the opportunity to win this book.

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      14. Barry 604 485 9393May 18, 2014 at 5:37 PM

        would like to win the book mostly for the info but beautiful photos are a bonus

        ReplyDelete

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